Creating a wicking bed

 
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So I’m not going to claim I personally created this wicking bed or else my husband won’t let me live it down… so definitely full credit to the Hubby before I even begin :)

We were gifted a half-wine barrel and it has been sitting empty in our patio for about a year or so, and we have finally put it to good use! Originally we were thinking about putting a citrus tree in it, but we have wanted to dip our toes in veggie gardening without fully committing as we don’t have the right ground space at the moment. So this is where the wicking bed comes into it.

This diagram below by The Little Veggie Patch Co explains how a wicking bed works. Essentially it is a ‘self watering’ garden bed.

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You can see above the fill point, down pipe and overflow valve at the bottom. The wine barrel is on wheels so we can move it around depending on the sun

You can see above the fill point, down pipe and overflow valve at the bottom. The wine barrel is on wheels so we can move it around depending on the sun

The pipe in the middle is a mini worm farm. Veggie scraps go in, and there are holes in the pipe under the soil for the worms.

The pipe in the middle is a mini worm farm. Veggie scraps go in, and there are holes in the pipe under the soil for the worms.

Below are the first cherry tomato harvest (Jan 2019)! We have also had an abundance of basil, dill, lettuce and we have also successfully grown one full capsicum (!!) and we have not so successfully grown spinach (too much sun). It is really satisfying growing your own herbs and vegetables. A wicking bed, whilst it seems complicated at first and does take a bit of work to set up, is a really great way to grow your on veggies if you don’t have much space, if you don’t have the right soil or are too scared to commit to growing in the ground (like me!)

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